Book Reviews: Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life by Barbara Kingsolver with Steven L. Hopp and Camille Kingsolver

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This book, title and authors in Post Title, is absolutely amazing. It’s about a family spending one year deciding to eat nothing but local food, whether from the farmer’s market or from the farm land on the farm they move to. It includes miles of information on currant environmental issues, information about the food we do and can eat and where it comes from, helpful hints and handy information on gardening/farming and raising livestock, and best of all it also includes recipes. The diversity of the information provided, coupled with humor as well, is what I love about this book. It’s not just informational, like a textbook, but ties it into a real story.

Description from the inside jackets of the book and copy and pasted from Goodreads.com.

“Bestselling author Barbara Kingsolver returns with her first nonfiction narrative that will open your eyes in a hundred new ways to an old truth: You are what you eat.

“As the U.S. population made an unprecedented mad dash for the Sun Belt, one carload of us paddled against the tide, heading for the Promised Land where water falls from the sky and green stuff grows all around. We were about to begin the adventure of realigning our lives with our food chain.

“Naturally, our first stop was to buy junk food and fossil fuel. . . .”

Hang on for the ride: With characteristic poetry and pluck, Barbara Kingsolver and her family sweep readers along on their journey away from the industrial-food pipeline to a rural life in which they vow to buy only food raised in their own neighborhood, grow it themselves, or learn to live without it. Their good-humored search yields surprising discoveries about turkey sex life and overly zealous zucchini plants, en route to a food culture that’s better for the neighborhood and also better on the table. Part memoir, part journalistic investigation, Animal, Vegetable, Miracle makes a passionate case for putting the kitchen back at the center of family life and diversified farms at the center of the American diet.

“This is the story of a year in which we made every attempt to feed ourselves animals and vegetables whose provenance we really knew . . . and of how our family was changed by our first year of deliberately eating food produced from the same place where we worked, went to school, loved our neighbors, drank the water, and breathed the air.”

A librarian reccomended it to me and I now reccomend it to you. I thuroughly hope you enjoy and love this book as much as I did and reccomend it to your friends too!

Book Review: The Goddess is in the Details: Wisdom for the Everyday Witch by Deborah Blake

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I absolutely loved this book. There were chapters in here that I; a single, childless, 21 year-old witch; did not have use for but I know the knowledge will come in handy in the future.

There are many things from the book I can’t wait to try. A few cleaning suggestions (that I’ll post later separately) in Chapter 9, a pagan twist to celebrating St. Patrick’s Day in Chapter 19 were the two I was most excited about. Deborah Blake gave me many things to think about and broadened my way of thinking about how I can bring Wicca into everyday life.

The book has chapters on marriage, raising pagan children, about being an out-of-the-broom-closet witch, and the beginning is great for those thinking about becoming Pagan or new to the whole thing.

The book is published by Llewellyn Worldwide. To visit their site for more on the author or more on WIcca or Paganism goodies, go to: http://www.llewellyn.com/ or for more on the author alone visit: http://www.llewellyn.com/author.php?author_id=4205

I give this book 5 roses out of five. (Roses instead of thumbs, duh)